First Time Streaming on Twitch Since February

Last Updated on July 14, 2020 by Michael Brockbank

Last night was the first time the kids and I were live on Twitch since the middle of February. And although we didn’t pull in very much of an audience, it was still fun to play Minecraft. In fact, I’m planning on getting back to a schedule for streaming on Twitch.

I know I’m not going to be a huge streamer with a massive audience. But, I still find it fun to interact with people and simply chat about virtually anything.

Not to mention we’re still trying to develop a brand while helping various charities with ColoradoPlays.

Why am I Streaming on Twitch?

It’s not that I’m any good at any one particular game. My interests are so scattered that it is near impossible for me to become an “expert” player. However, going live is more than just showing off my skill.

It’s not about winning tournaments or being the best around.

I am Playing the Game Anyway

Since I am playing the game anyway, I might as well hit the button for streaming on Twitch. Essentially, it’s like having strangers come up to me while playing a game at an arcade and striking up a conversation.

And there have been a few times when I helped someone learn how to play certain aspects of a game. But if I’m loading up the game, why not share and be social?

Meeting Some Fun and Engaging People

Over the years, I’ve met some amazing and wonderful people while streaming on Twitch. And yes, we’ve had some trolls come into the chat as well. But, the good easily outweighs the bad.

I think a lot of that has to do with our personality while streaming. We don’t take the game too seriously and are more relaxed than many broadcasters on Twitch.

Awareness and Donations

We do our part to spread awareness for the charities we involve ourselves in. We really don’t bring in that big of an audience to donate a ton of money. But, we do our part to help out however we can.

A big part of our issue is the low numbers we experience, whether it’s from the blog or video. Then again, we haven’t been the most consistent with content.

It’s My Old-School Platform

I’ve been streaming on Twitch off and on since before it was a popular platform. I remember back in the day, my brother and I would join a Day Z mod game with our friend who was getting into live broadcasts.

Since then, even though it’s grown a bit toxic and controversial, it’s been my go-to platform.

Why the Low Numbers for Viewers?

Low Streaming Numbers

We had one average viewer throughout the entire 2.5 hours streaming on Twitch last night. And while some people might get depressed at those numbers, we still had a lot of fun.

See, it’s not about becoming an influencer or making that mad Twitch money. It’s about the game, good company, and interaction.

But if you’re curious, there are a few reasons why we don’t have massive numbers:

Well, When You’re Not Consistent…

When you don’t create consistent content, you can’t really build an audience. It’s the same with blogging or on YouTube. People like to rely on you for a set schedule of being a creator.

This is entirely my fault as I’ve been a slacker as of late and have a hard time delegating the workload. But, I am keeping my fingers crossed that the last half of 2020 will have a different result.

This means getting back into a regular schedule for streaming on Twitch, uploading videos to YouTube, and even blogging.

Games Make the Difference

Not every game is going to have an interested viewership. Some titles are simply more popular than others. But, we refuse to follow gaming trends as there are some out there that will never get installed onto my computer.

Many people want to see the latest and greatest titles. But, I enjoy some of the older games. Mostly because I can’t afford to buy the latest games that come out on a regular basis.

However, we do play a few of the more popular games that are ranked high in Twitch according to viewer totals.

It Takes a While to Accumulate an Audience

Building an audience on Twitch is much like doing so for YouTube, blogging, Facebook, Twitter, and any other social platform. It’s going to take a while before you see those massive numbers.

Especially if you’re starting from scratch and not really particularly awesome at any one game.

On the Internet today, it depends on what you’re branding yourself as and who you’re trying to engage. It can be a very long process before you bring in those high viewer numbers. But, the people watching will be more interactive than if they lurk your channel.

Are There Plans to Stream on YouTube?

I’ve been toying with the idea of streaming on YouTube. I’m just not sure how much of an impact it would make, overall. Actually, it might help the channel grow as we upload more video content.

But since we haven’t really stuck to a schedule for streaming on Twitch as of late, it’s hard to tell if it would be beneficial or not. After all, I don’t really have the data to compare platforms for ColoradoPlays.

However, I am curious as to what type of audience we can accumulate. The problem is finding the time to get on to play during the day.

I want to keep our Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday schedule on Twitch, so I have to find time to go live on YouTube. Perhaps we can try streaming in the afternoon if my client work is done for the day.

To make a long story short, I would love to see what YouTube can offer in terms of viewership. I just need to find the time to go live.

Do You Enjoy Streaming on Twitch?

While playing last night, I forgot how much fun I have when streaming on Twitch. Like I said, it’s not about having thousands of concurrent viewers. We just like to interact with others and have a good time with a fun game.

As long as you’re not too concerned with becoming incredibly popular overnight, you can enjoy the moment and probably meet some fun people.

Now, let’s just see if we can maintain a schedule for longer than three months at a time.

Michael Brockbank
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Michael Brockbank

Michael developed ColoradoPlays to help various charities through his favorite pastime. Since then, the blog and Twitch channels have donated several hundred dollars to Extra Life, Geeks of Grandeur and Operation Supply Drop to name a few.